Enjoy the quick footed stylings of Traffic Skateboards man in Japan, Hiroki Muraoka. Hiroki's Look Left section has been kindly uploaded by the good folks over at Theories of Atlantis, hit play and get involved.

Hiroki's part was filmed by Yoji Mizusawa, Hitoshi Nagaoka, Colin Read and Marc Ohata, and edited by Josh Stewart.

You can get a little more familiar with Hiroki via the extracts from his ER interview below, follow the link to check out the rest:

"I do remember when you were younger, even when you’d make a trick, you’d be so stubborn about redoing it until you made one that you were satisfied with.

Yeah. Even if it was a make, if I moved a little weird or wasn’t exactly how I was imagining it, I’d want to do it over and over until it was right. There were a lot of times where the filmers would have to tell me it was fine to get me to stop.

So you’ve changed since then? Why?

I used to have really high standards and wanted to land everything absolutely perfectly, so I never wanted to use anything I got because I wasn’t hyped on it, but now I’ve come to look at it more as my own unique style and feel like I understand my skating now more than ever. Or at least I feel like I’m not adding any false steez to my tricks or whatever. In any case, before I wasn’t really expressing myself in my tricks. I was just imitating the skaters I admired I think.

It feels like you’ve got a diverse bag of tricks. Is that something you’re aware of when you’re skating?

Yeah, I try to stay conscious of having a wide variety. Like so I can skate everything. I think the ability to adapt is really sought after in street skating. I used to not skate ramps at all, but after I met Deshi, we’d roll together and there’d be times when we go to these spots where it’s nothing but super steep ramps. You’ve really got no choice but try and skate it when you’re put in a situation like that. That’s all there is anyways. It’s like, we came all the way out here on our day off so even if I’m not good at it, I’m still gonna try. That’s how I learned to skate transition."